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The Perfect World >> Domestic Sphere >> Baking

Baking

CalGal -- Thursday, July 04, 2002 -- 07:35:57 PM

How-tos, tips, recipes.

This thread is tagged: cooking, baking, cake
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Anna Trueblood -- Sunday, January 01, 2006 -- 10:50:55 PM -- 7086 of 13465

Quick is leavened with baking soda or powder. With quicks, you usually mix the wet and dry ingredients separately then add the dries to the wets in a couple of shots. I've found it's important not to overmix-- to the point where a few lumps makes a better product than a totally smooth batter.

Yeasted bread thrives on a benevolent neglect. Mix, leave alone, knead, leave alone, shape, leave alone, bake. You're fine as long as you don't kill the yeast at the start by putting it in liquids that are too hot. I think kneading by hand makes a more tender loaf than by machine but I'm kickin' it old skool.

Agnes Day -- Sunday, January 01, 2006 -- 11:54:51 PM -- 7087 of 13465
I'm in with the In Crowd, baby. I go where the In Crowd goes.

Is it the oatmeal bread recipe that has molasses in it? If so, I can vouch for its perfection.

Nay -- Sunday, January 01, 2006 -- 11:58:28 PM -- 7088 of 13465
Why? Fuck you, that's why.

Yes, it has molasses in it. I was very surprised by that!

And yeah, this will be made entirely by hand because I don't have a bread machine. The recipe will give me two loaves, which I think will be a perfect amount.

Question: can I just use the teflon coated tin bread pans I already have or do these suck for baking bread?

Agnes Day -- Monday, January 02, 2006 -- 12:05:18 AM -- 7089 of 13465
I'm in with the In Crowd, baby. I go where the In Crowd goes.

I use teflon pans.

Post the recipe, if you don't mind. (I'd double the recipe - the bread keeps very well.)

Nay -- Monday, January 02, 2006 -- 12:05:50 AM -- 7090 of 13465
Why? Fuck you, that's why.

Ok, when I'm less hung over, I'll post it. It's kind of a monster recipe.

Agnes Day -- Monday, January 02, 2006 -- 12:08:09 AM -- 7091 of 13465
I'm in with the In Crowd, baby. I go where the In Crowd goes.

I lost my copy of it years ago, but I get a hankering for it every now and then.

Gee, just think, if I had access to the internet, I could google for it!

rms -- Monday, January 02, 2006 -- 12:18:46 AM -- 7092 of 13465

Nay, you will probably want to grease the pans, teflon or not. This is the one use I have for Crisco. I'd love to see the recipe -- for a while I was baking bread pretty often, now we make challah about every other week -- I start the dough on Thursday, DH and Anna take it from there Friday (Anna loves to braid the loaves) and we freeze one unbaked for the following week.

Not quite baking, but for NYE we made Anna's favorite terribly exotic treat, which she didn't believe we could make at home in our own kitchen: marshmallow rice krispy treats! We used cocoa krispies, even more thrilling.

Nay -- Monday, January 02, 2006 -- 12:19:57 AM -- 7093 of 13465
Why? Fuck you, that's why.

Haha, I can't believe she didn't think you could make them homemade. Man, that's the ONLY way to have them, the packaged ones are gross.

rms -- Monday, January 02, 2006 -- 12:25:56 AM -- 7094 of 13465

She's almost 5, and she'd only had them at Borders when we stop for a snack while we're out shopping -- we often get one big one to share. I don't think she's ever tried the packaged ones.

Ally C -- Monday, January 02, 2006 -- 12:38:02 AM -- 7095 of 13465

Tell us how it comes out, Nay. I'd also like to see the recipe when you have a chance.

Quick breads, like Anna said, don't use yeast. Think of banana-nut bread, pumpkin, zucchini...all of those. The batter can be turned into muffins, too.

Nay -- Monday, January 02, 2006 -- 12:44:06 AM -- 7096 of 13465
Why? Fuck you, that's why.

That's so cute that she was so excited about making rice crispy treats. I am really looking forward to making things with Jack. I hope he is interested in cooking but even if he isn't, he's going to be my cheese grating, potato peeling slave and I can't wait!

Marya -- Monday, January 02, 2006 -- 12:47:03 AM -- 7097 of 13465
You are the Proust of TPW, and we all prefer J.K. Rowling. -j. ross

Three rises is a lot of rises. Most yeast breads have two and sometimes you can get away with one of those being pretty short. If you find this one a bit burdensome but are interested in the basic process, some of us can probably suggest some lower-stress recipes.

Nay -- Monday, January 02, 2006 -- 04:10:35 AM -- 7098 of 13465
Why? Fuck you, that's why.

Here is my Aunt Bev's oatmeal bread recipe. It seems awfully fussy to me, but I think it may just be due to decades of tweaking. Also, she knows I've never baked bread before, so she may have added in some extra details, like making sure the temp is exactly right for the yeast and so on.

Marya -- Monday, January 02, 2006 -- 04:53:54 AM -- 7099 of 13465
You are the Proust of TPW, and we all prefer J.K. Rowling. -j. ross

That really doesn't look bad to me, and I only count two rises. The only thing that will take any real extra time is letting the oatmeal mixture cool, and it seems like you could do that ahead, like while you're having coffee in the morning, before you do the yeast-softening step, which won't take more than five minutes or so. (I wouldn't bother with a candy thermometer. Just feel the water and make sure it feels lukewarm, not hot-warm. You might get some tiny differences in rising time that way, but you won't kill the yeast by dissolving it in water that is slightly too cool. Same goes for the oatmeal goop--too cool is better than too warm.)

It looks like a good recipe and I might try it. Thank you for posting it!

Nay -- Monday, January 02, 2006 -- 04:55:31 AM -- 7100 of 13465
Why? Fuck you, that's why.

Yeah, in typing up the recipe I realized that it is only 2 rises. I guess I was thinking of the rest period after punching it down as a rise but now it all doesn't look too hard. Maybe tomorrow morning I'll hit the store after dropping off Jack and give it a go.

Marya -- Monday, January 02, 2006 -- 05:00:23 AM -- 7101 of 13465
You are the Proust of TPW, and we all prefer J.K. Rowling. -j. ross

Once you get used to what the main steps are in making bread it goes pretty fast. Most of it is downtime and you can always stick the dough in the refrigerator to slow down the rise if you find you can't be around to finish up right on time.

Curie Tournesol -- Monday, January 02, 2006 -- 08:30:47 AM -- 7102 of 13465
They are better than stars or water/Better than voices of winds that sing/Better than any man's fair daughter/ Your green glass beads on a silver ring.

but you won't kill the yeast by dissolving it in water that is slightly too cool

What?

Marya -- Monday, January 02, 2006 -- 04:10:48 PM -- 7103 of 13465
You are the Proust of TPW, and we all prefer J.K. Rowling. -j. ross

You can kill yeast with cool water? Surely not.

debby -- Monday, January 02, 2006 -- 04:30:18 PM -- 7104 of 13465
lighten up

I used to make that bread all the time, it was very easy. And actuually, I have all the ingredients...

kas -- Monday, January 02, 2006 -- 06:00:18 PM -- 7105 of 13465

I agree with Marya, too cool of water may slow your rise but too hot will kill the yeast. Actual cold water would be bad but I always just test the water with my finger with no trouble.

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The Perfect World >> Domestic Sphere >> Baking