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The Perfect World >> Domestic Sphere >> Baking

Baking

CalGal -- Thursday, July 04, 2002 -- 07:35:57 PM

How-tos, tips, recipes.

This thread is tagged: cooking, baking, cake
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Curie Tournesol -- Tuesday, February 22, 2005 -- 01:01:40 AM -- 4810 of 13465
They are better than stars or water/Better than voices of winds that sing/Better than any man's fair daughter/ Your green glass beads on a silver ring.

I've never used one, but I imagine it's similar to old-fashioned waffle makers or muffin molds. Heat it, brush on a thin coat of vegetable oil (make sure your brush doesn't burn) and then pour in your batter. Sounds like you need a thinner batter as well.

Krista -- Tuesday, February 22, 2005 -- 02:59:19 AM -- 4811 of 13465
And time yet for a hundred indecisions,/And for a hundred visions and revisions,/Before the taking of a toast and tea.

I have the microplane fine, ribbon fine, and zester. The Mistah went a little nuts for Christmas. Anyway, I haven't needed to zest anything yet, so I haven't actually used the specific zester one, but I think the fine one would be more than acceptable for zesting.

vw -- Tuesday, February 22, 2005 -- 01:26:15 PM -- 4812 of 13465
I got okra, enough to choke ya, beans of every kind/If hungry is what's eatin' you, I'll sell you peace of mind/And I hate to disappoint you, but I got no love today.

Any idea how hot it has to be before you pour the batter in? And is it foolish to think I can use it on a loathsome electric stove?

Curie Tournesol -- Tuesday, February 22, 2005 -- 02:12:31 PM -- 4813 of 13465
They are better than stars or water/Better than voices of winds that sing/Better than any man's fair daughter/ Your green glass beads on a silver ring.

VW: I don't see why you couldn't use an electric stove. I did a search and here are the most helpful pages I found:

This is an interesting discussion about wafers from some sort of historical food discussion group. Several items about pizzelles and the relative stickiness of irons and various batters. A lot of interesting discussion and people reporting on their experiments that you might find useful.

This page has info on seasoning your traditional stovetop iron and some recipes and instructions.

According to this recipe, there's always some sort of experimentation involved as to getting your temperature and cooking time just right.

Good luck! I think it'd be very cool to inherit something like that.

vw -- Tuesday, February 22, 2005 -- 04:22:35 PM -- 4814 of 13465
I got okra, enough to choke ya, beans of every kind/If hungry is what's eatin' you, I'll sell you peace of mind/And I hate to disappoint you, but I got no love today.

Thanks! Geez, web research, wow. I'll post here when I try again to let you know if anything works out. Granny just moved into assisted living, so she's unloading all her belongings and she's got 91 years of collected baking equipment, and some very cool stuff...tins of all shapes, the kind of stuff you'd never buy cause you'll only use it once, but if you inherit it, it's fun to have.

mollyT -- Tuesday, February 22, 2005 -- 04:26:52 PM -- 4815 of 13465

How cool.

The chocolate layer cake I've been craving for days turned out dry and gross. The chocolate buttercream frosting is good, though.

Jillian PlicPlic -- Tuesday, February 22, 2005 -- 04:35:42 PM -- 4816 of 13465
Hey, I'm flossing here! You don't fuck with flossing - that's a safety issue.

Man, what a disappointment, molly! Just eat the frosting and toss the dry cake. I hate when that happens.

Curie Tournesol -- Tuesday, February 22, 2005 -- 04:39:05 PM -- 4817 of 13465
They are better than stars or water/Better than voices of winds that sing/Better than any man's fair daughter/ Your green glass beads on a silver ring.

I'll post here when I try again to let you know if anything works out.

Please do! I'd love to hear how they turn out. I remember seriously considering buying a pizzelle iron from Williams-Sonoma back when it was a little print catalog that you had to fill an order form for and send in with a check.

JennyD -- Tuesday, February 22, 2005 -- 04:45:11 PM -- 4818 of 13465

Good thing you made that backup cake, Molly.

mollyT -- Tuesday, February 22, 2005 -- 06:43:49 PM -- 4819 of 13465

No kidding.

I got the recipe from epicurius.com and one of the user comments was that the cake turned out dry and awful. But other people liked it. I'll have to add my one star vote to the site and warn others away.

Ellie Mayhem -- Tuesday, February 22, 2005 -- 06:51:27 PM -- 4820 of 13465

what recipe Molly?

mollyT -- Tuesday, February 22, 2005 -- 07:09:27 PM -- 4821 of 13465

It was this: Chocolate Layer Cake with Milk Chocolate Frosting."

Ellie Mayhem -- Tuesday, February 22, 2005 -- 07:27:47 PM -- 4822 of 13465

how dissapointing. Have you tried the Double Chocolate Layer Cake? It's my favorite chocolate cake recipe on epicurious. Underbake it and it's a gorgeous molten cake, bake it for the right time and it's just a perfect chocolate cake.

mollyT -- Tuesday, February 22, 2005 -- 07:34:52 PM -- 4823 of 13465

I saw that one, but I can't remember why I picked the one I did. I think I wasn't in the mood for ganache.

Shhhhh, don't tell anyone, but I made the milk chocolate frosting with Hershey bars. The stuff in the baking aisle was expensive and the Hershey bars were on sale for $.25 each. The frosting was delicious.

mollyT -- Tuesday, February 22, 2005 -- 09:57:59 PM -- 4824 of 13465

The honey almond crunch cake is significantly better 24 hours after coming out of the oven. I had a slice for breakfast and it was better than the nibble I had last night, but the slice I'm eating right now is better yet again.

I used dark brown sugar instead of light and think the top came out unappealingly dark. But it doesn't taste burnt, it just looks burnt.

J-Ro -- Tuesday, February 22, 2005 -- 10:51:01 PM -- 4825 of 13465
It will all be OK in the end. If it isn't OK, it isn't the end.

Being better after a rest is a characteristic of honey cakes and other cakes with heavy, moist ingredients. I'm not sure why. If it were simply a matter of the moisture redistributing itself within the cake, only texture would improve, but flavor usually does, too. Not that honey cake is ever good.

Alice CK -- Wednesday, February 23, 2005 -- 04:02:19 AM -- 4826 of 13465
the glass in the toilet is quite a pretty blue

Honey is hygroscopic, meaning it draws moisture from the air. So resting would make it moister than it was right out of the oven. Could that be responsible for the improvement?

(Random note: every time I read or type or otherwise experience the word "hygroscopic," I think it's gotta be wrong. The greek root for water is hydro-, not hygro-! What's that g doing there?)

Rachel grrl_geek -- Wednesday, February 23, 2005 -- 06:43:49 AM -- 4827 of 13465
Violence isn't the answer. Violence is the question. "Yes" is the answer.

From the OED:

hygro-
before a vowel also hygr-, repr. Gr. wet, moist, fluid: extensively employed in Greek; the English compounds are mostly scientific terms of recent formation.
hygroscopic
Said of bodies which readily absorb moisture from the air, so as to swell up, contract in length, or change form or consistence, and thus indicate roughly the presence or absence of humidity; sensitive to moisture.
Ellie Mayhem -- Wednesday, February 23, 2005 -- 02:18:33 PM -- 4828 of 13465

hygroscopic

ooh! I have a new word for the "Hair! Not The Musical" thread.

J-Ro -- Wednesday, February 23, 2005 -- 03:09:51 PM -- 4829 of 13465
It will all be OK in the end. If it isn't OK, it isn't the end.

I am baking brioches à tête in my new brioche molds this morning. The HS called and asked me to bake for career day, and I figured it was a good time to try out the recipe. I made the dough last night and refrigerated it. Then I got up and made half of them, because I only have six molds.

So far two of the têtes have sort of fallen off to the side, as if imperfectly guillotined. The kids can have those. Otherwise, they look good. They feel nice and light, too. The next batch is rising now. They only take 8 minutes to bake.

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The Perfect World >> Domestic Sphere >> Baking